Wednesday November 19, 2014

"It Is Not A Question of Who Is Right Or Wrong But What Is Right Or Wrong That Counts."
--Geoff Metctalf


Updated 0845  PDT                               
                                                                                                                                                            
Call anytime(888) 283-5051




   Old Blood: The Beginning, Book 1 | [Charles Thornton]          Product Details  

Old Blood: The Beginning, Book One 
Old Blood Book Two




Lost Scrolls of the Holy Beclay: Lost Scrolls, Book 1 | J. K. Haugen 


Please Listen to Geoff's Audio Books
(and tell ten people to tell ten people to tell ten people?)

World & National     

3 Americans Killed in Jerusalem Synagogue Attack
This Is A Religious War
       Israelis attend the funerals of Aryeh Kupinsky, Cary William Levine, and Avraham Goldberg.

Two Palestinians stormed a Jerusalem synagogue on Tuesday, attacking worshippers praying inside with meat cleavers and a gun, and killing four people before they were killed in a shootout with police, officials said.

Three of the victims — Aryeh Kopinsky, Calman Levine, Moshe Twersky — were dual American-Israeli citizens, a police official confirmed to CBS News. The fourth, Avraham Shmuel Goldberg, was a dual British-Israeli citizen. All four were also rabbis.
RABBIS' MURDER IN SYNAGOGUE PUTS JERUSALEM CLOSE TO BRINK...
SCENE 'FROM HOLOCAUST'...
GUN CONTROLS EASED IN ISRAEL FOR SELF-DEFENSE...
PALESTINIANS CELEBRATE IN STREETS...
Residents fear worst still to come...
BIBI: We will 'respond harshly'...
Orders demolition of terrorists' homes...
Attacks pose new challenges for security forces...
Israeli tourist attacked in Brooklyn...
'Dirty bloody Jew'...
NYPD Steps Up Patrols...


Obama to announce immigration order n Las Vegas Friday

               

President Barack Obama plans to announce an executive order in Las Vegas on Friday to address immigration reform, CNBC has confirmed.

Another source familiar with the situation told CNBC that Obama could yet give "30,000 feet" outline of an immigration order on Thursday and add detail in Las Vegas on Friday.

The president has been long expected to make an announcement that would protect up to five million unauthorized immigrants from the threat of deportation and provide work permits.

Obama asked for $3.7 billion to address the border crisis. The Republican-controlled House of Representatives, however, passed a measure that only gave Obama a fraction of what he sought and made it easier to deport the young migrants arriving at the border, a provision opposed by Democrats and immigration advocates. In the end, Congress adjourned without a final bill.



FBI Warns Ferguson Decision 'Will Likely' Lead to Violence by Extremists Protesters
                   PHOTO: A man watches as police walk through a cloud of smoke during a clash with protesters, Aug. 13, 2014, in Ferguson, Mo.
As the nation waits to hear whether a Missouri police officer will face charges for killing unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., the FBI is warning law enforcement agencies across the country that the decision “will likely” lead some extremist protesters to threaten and even attack police officers or federal agents.

Peaceful protesters could be caught in the middle, and electrical facilities or water treatment plants could also become targets. In addition, so-called “hacktivists” like the group “Anonymous” could try to launch cyber-attacks against authorities.

“The announcement of the grand jury’s decision … will likely be exploited by some individuals to justify threats and attacks against law enforcement and critical infrastructure,” the FBI says in an intelligence bulletin issued in recent days. “This also poses a threat to those civilians engaged in lawful or otherwise constitutionally protected activities.”
Here Is the True Story of Michael Brown
Police set 'rules of engagement'...
Militant group offers cash rewards for 'location' of officer...
'If You Do Not Have A Gun, Get One Soon'...
CLAIM: Muslim groups seek to co-opt Ferguson protests...


Liberal 'hell no' caucus rises

The defeat of the Keystone XL pipeline in the Senate marked a major show of muscle for next year’s new hell-no caucus: liberals.

Liberal Senate Democrats united to block the controversial project, even though their imperiled Democratic colleague Mary Landrieu of Louisiana begged them not to at a Democratic Caucus lunch on Tuesday afternoon.

It was a remarkable move for a group that has stood behind Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) over the years, as he sought to protect vulnerable moderates, like Landrieu and some of her now-ousted colleagues, from taking tough votes on divisive environmental, health care and social issues.



Union Leaders say Democrats Are Lost


Senate Democrats filibustered the Keystone XL pipeline on Tuesday, in a vote that reverberated from Louisiana, where a key senator’s career is now likely doomed, to the broader national Democratic Party, where environmentalists have emerged triumphant in a divisive internal battle with labor unions.

The Keystone vote took on symbolism far beyond the small impact on American crude supplies and the slight effect expected on gas prices. Environmentalists drew lines and dared moderate and conservative Democrats to cross it. In the end, most were unwilling to defy the ascendant movement, and it marked a key moment in the climate change debate.

The vote fell one shy of the 60 needed to overcome the filibuster, with 14 Democrats joining all 45 Republicans in backing the project.

Traditional blue-collar labor unions, though, desperately sought the pipeline’s approval, saying it was a test of whether the Democratic Party could be trusted on jobs.

“The majority of Democrats in the Senate and the White House just don’t get it, even though the recent election results surely should have sunk in by now. They have lost their way, their purpose and their base,” said Laborers’ International Union of North America President Terry O’Sullivan.



Under Obama, US personal freedom ranking slips below France

Americans' assessments of their personal freedom have significantly declined under President Obama, according to a new study from the Legatum Institute in London, and the United States now ranks below 20 other countries on this measure.

The research shows that citizens of countries including France, Uruguay, and Costa Rica now feel that they enjoy more personal freedom than Americans.
             
As the Washington Examiner reported this morning, representatives of the Legatum Institute are in the U.S. this week to promote the sixth edition of their Prosperity Index. The index aims to measure aspects of prosperity that typical gross domestic product measurements don’t include, such as entrepreneurship and opportunity, education, and social capital.



Senate Set for 'Ugly' GOP Rift Over NSA Bill

The controversial bill blocking mass phone surveillance by the National Security Agency may cause an “ugly” rift in the GOP when it is introduced in the Senate again next year, The Hill reported.

The legislation, the USA Freedom Act sponsored by Vermont Democrat Sen. Patrick Leahy, came up two votes short on Tuesday of the 60 votes needed to advance in the Senate.

The vote was largely along party lines, with 41 Republicans and just one Democrat opposing it. The Republican-controlled House had previously passed a version of the bill, which could limit the NSA's surveillance powers over Americans.

When the bill resurfaces under a GOP-run Senate in 2015, the battle lines are likely to be drawn between potential GOP presidential candidates Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky.



Liberal Writer Now Worries About Obamacare

A week ago, liberal writer Brian Beutler urged Obamcare supporters to stop panicking over the Supreme Court’s decision to hear a new case against President Obama’s legacy legislation. Now, he is alarmed.

Beutler admits he is worried over the growing scandal created by Jonathan Gruber, an economics professor widely credited with crafting the Affordable Care Act and bragging that Democrats lied to get it passed.

"'Grubergate' Is Giving the Supreme Court Cover to Destroy Obamacare," read the headline this week over his latest article on the healthcare debate in the leading leftist magazine, The New Republic.



In New GOP House, Committee Chairs Go Mostly to Men

The victories of the midterm elections swept in a diverse new class of GOP freshman, but the House Republican committee leadership due to be appointed Wednesday is almost exclusively male and white.

The Republican Steering Committee announced its recommendations Tuesday after convening all day to select the heads of 17 committees.

The panel consists of the elected leadership, top committee chairmen, and regional representatives who interview candidates and vote on who they think should be granted chairmanships.



Jon Stewart to Pelosi: You're as 'Politically Craven' as Any Man

When House Democrats refused to alter the rules last week so Rep. Tammy Duckworth  could vote by proxy they said it was because it could begin a slippery slope of other requests.

But "Daily Show" host Jon Stewart said Tuesday he believes something else is to blame.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, he said, has received an award from National Partnership for Women and Families "for her leadership in fighting for working women," and once filed a friend-of-the-court brief for a woman whose employer wouldn't work with her to keep her on the job during her pregnancy.

"You are suppressing the vote of a minority pregnant woman who is a wounded war veteran. She is everything you supposedly stand for stuffed into one individual. She is a Democratic demographic turduckworth," Stewart said.

"And that's how the precedent was set that a woman leader could be every bit as politically craven as her male counterparts," Stewart said.



Stupidity reconsidered: The election proved Americans aren't fooled by Gruber and Obanma

Jonathan Gruber set off a firestorm of controversy, at least in the conservative media, with the recent revelation of his comments about the “stupidity of the American people,” which allowed the Affordable Care Act to be passed. In essence, he admitted that the bill was written in a way that would allow its purveyors to characterize it as the cure-all and salvation for a health care system that was in trouble, with no danger of their deception being discovered by a populace that was trusting and naive.

He obviously never intended for his comments to make it into the public sphere and did not consider the fact that someone is always recording on their smartphone.



'Put up or shut up time': America expects the Republicans to match big talk with action

Phil Gramm, an avid waterfowler, and I were sitting in a duck blind on Maryland’s Eastern Shore waiting for the birds to fly and discussing conservatism, politics and the Senate. After analyzing a few of his colleagues, the senator from Texas asked me, “What are the four most dangerous words a senator can utter on the Senate floor?”

I had no idea. He smiled and answered his own question. They are, he declared, “I have an idea.” They are dangerous, he claimed, because “half of your colleagues will dive under their desks, and some will simply flee and could, in their headlong rush for the doors, knock you over.” The Senate — or the House, for that matter — haven’t changed since the Texan left, but it is high time they do.

Effective and successful political movements, as Harvard’s Daniel Yergin observes in his “Commanding Heights,” begin, win and (more importantly) hold power based not on organizational prowess or attacks on their adversaries, but on their ideas. When they lose faith in or replace those ideas with empty rhetoric, their hold on power atrophies.




Medal of Honor
The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force which can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States.
GeneTrerally presented to its recipient by the President of the United States of America in the name of Congress.
The first award of the Medal of Honor was made March 25, 1863 to Private JACOB PARROTT.The last award of the Medal of Honor was made September 15, 2011 to Sergeant DAKOTA MEYER.

Since then there have been:  • 3458 recipients of the Medal of Honor.
    • Today there are 85 Living Recipients of the Medal of Honor.


BENAVIDEZ, ROY P.
Rank: Master Sergeant
Organization: U.S. Army
Company: Detachment B-56
Division: 5th Special Forces Group


 
BENAVIDEZ, ROY P.
 
Citation

Master Sergeant (then Staff Sergeant) Roy P. Benavidez United States Army, who distinguished himself by a series of daring and extremely valorous actions on 2 May 1968 while assigned to Detachment B56, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces, Republic of Vietnam. On the morning of 2 May 1968, a 12-man Special Forces Reconnaissance Team was inserted by helicopters in a dense jungle area west of Loc Ninh, Vietnam to gather intelligence information about confirmed large-scale enemy activity. This area was controlled and routinely patrolled by the North Vietnamese Army. After a short period of time on the ground, the team met heavy enemy resistance, and requested emergency extraction. Three helicopters attempted extraction, but were unable to land due to intense enemy small arms and anti-aircraft fire. Sergeant Benavidez was at the Forward Operating Base in Loc Ninh monitoring the operation by radio when these helicopters returned to off-load wounded crewmembers and to assess aircraft damage. Sergeant Benavidez voluntarily boarded a returning aircraft to assist in another extraction attempt. Realizing that all the team members were either dead or wounded and unable to move to the pickup zone, he directed the aircraft to a nearby clearing where he jumped from the hovering helicopter, and ran approximately 75 meters under withering small arms fire to the crippled team. Prior to reaching the team's position he was wounded in his right leg, face, and head. Despite these painful injuries, he took charge, repositioning the team members and directing their fire to facilitate the landing of an extraction aircraft, and the loading of wounded and dead team members. He then threw smoke canisters to direct the aircraft to the team's position. Despite his severe wounds and under intense enemy fire, he carried and dragged half of the wounded team members to the awaiting aircraft. He then provided protective fire by running alongside the aircraft as it moved to pick up the remaining team members. As the enemy's fire intensified, he hurried to recover the body and classified documents on the dead team leader. When he reached the leader's body, Sergeant Benavidez was severely wounded by small arms fire in the abdomen and grenade fragments in his back. At nearly the same moment, the aircraft pilot was mortally wounded, and his helicopter crashed. Although in extremely critical condition due to his multiple wounds, Sergeant Benavidez secured the classified documents and made his way back to the wreckage, where he aided the wounded out of the overturned aircraft, and gathered the stunned survivors into a defensive perimeter. Under increasing enemy automatic weapons and grenade fire, he moved around the perimeter distributing water and ammunition to his weary men, reinstilling in them a will to live and fight. Facing a buildup of enemy opposition with a beleaguered team, Sergeant Benavidez mustered his strength, began calling in tactical air strikes and directed the fire from supporting gunships to suppress the enemy's fire and so permit another extraction attempt. He was wounded again in his thigh by small arms fire while administering first aid to a wounded team member just before another extraction helicopter was able to land. His indomitable spirit kept him going as he began to ferry his comrades to the craft. On his second trip with the wounded, he was clubbed from additional wounds to his head and arms before killing his adversary. He then continued under devastating fire to carry the wounded to the helicopter. Upon reaching the aircraft, he spotted and killed two enemy soldiers who were rushing the craft from an angle that prevented the aircraft door gunner from firing upon them. With little strength remaining, he made one last trip to the perimeter to ensure that all classified material had been collected or destroyed, and to bring in the remaining wounded. Only then, in extremely serious condition from numerous wounds and loss of blood, did he allow himself to be pulled into the extraction aircraft. Sergeant Benavidez' gallant choice to join voluntarily his comrades who were in critical straits, to expose himself constantly to withering enemy fire, and his refusal to be stopped despite numerous severe wounds, saved the lives of at least eight men. His fearless personal leadership, tenacious devotion to duty, and extremely valorous actions in the face of overwhelming odds were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect the utmost credit on him and the United States Army.




From the Archives

American Fairness to a Fault — a Deadly One
Tuesday, 10 Nov 2009 02:28 PM

American’s tragic flaw is our unbridled fairness, which has been corrupted ever more by the cancer of political correctness to the point we put ourselves at risk rather than create even the perception of prejudice.

Sometime after the VOLAR (all volunteer) Army, the military veered from the “yes sir, yes sir, three bags full” blind adherence to all orders to the concept of refusing “unlawful orders” and that was ostensibly a good thing.

However, the uniformed services do not set or get to pick and choose foreign policy. The civilian leadership sets foreign policy, and the U.S. military enforces it — with a big, honking combined arms stick.

Retired Lt. Col. Ralph Peters has been one of the rare pundits with the courage to target the “culture of political correctness” in leadership of the military. In at least two interviews on Fox, Peters (correctly) blamed the culture of political correctness for the Army’s diffidence in taking action against Nidal Malik Hasan in the wake of knowledge of the problem.

Many mechanisms exist for dealing with matters of deep conscience — all without killing those one might think disagree with in principle.

However, it is not prejudice to discriminate based on threat facts in evidence. Refusal to act judiciously for fear of a tainted perception is just plain dumb.

Notwithstanding the articulated fears of the Army chief of staff and the secretary of Homeland Security, officials made an epic mistake in handling suspicions about Hasan. A mistake founded on political correctness and sustained by diffidence that cost the lives of innocents.

Reportedly, U.S. intelligence agencies were aware (months ago) that Hasan was attempting to make contact with people associated with al-Qaida. He spoke openly to too many people about his angst and misdirected sympathies. He was apparently a poster child for suspicion, and the Army failed bigtime to intervene.

“It is not known whether the intelligence agencies informed the Army that one of its officers was seeking to connect with suspected al-Qaida figures," the officials said.

But you damnbetcha they SHOULD have done so.

Investigators want to know whether Hasan maintained contact with a radical mosque leader from Virginia, Anwar al Awlaki, who now lives in Yemen and runs a Web site that promotes jihad around the world against the United States.

In a recent blog posting titled "Nidal Hassan Did the Right Thing," Awlaki calls Hasan a "hero" and a "man of conscience who could not bear living the contradiction of being a Muslim and serving in an army that is fighting against his own people."

Increasingly we are told people who knew or worked with Hasan say he seemed to become gradually more radical in his condemnation of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Subordinates and superiors had a responsibility to flag the inappropriate rhetoric, and they apparently did not.

The fear to speak out is a symptom of the PC disease fueled by recriminations and implied threats of discrimination — a fear that indirectly resulted in mayhem.

Sen. Joseph Lieberman said, "If Hasan was showing signs, saying to people that he had become an Islamist extremist, the U.S. Army has to have a zero tolerance," and despite the echo of shutting the barn door after the horse got out, he is right.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey Jr. is concerned that speculation about the religious beliefs of Hasan could “cause a backlash against some of our Muslim soldiers.” He’s right, but such a backlash would be a direct result of the failure of command — not prejudice.

When confronted about whether he thought the Army “dropped the ball” in not responding to warning signs, Casey replied that the Army needs to be careful not to jump to conclusions based on early tidbits of information.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R.-S.C., and Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., both of whom are veterans, took pains to say that Muslims have served honorably in the military and at risk to their lives.

“At the end of the day, this is not about his religion — the fact that this man was a Muslim,” Graham said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

But, hey, it is (kinda/sorta) about religion (when the FBI says 10 percent of American Mosques preach jihad) — at least from a risk analysis perspective.