Wednesday July 20th, 2016

"It Is Not A Question of Who Is Right Or Wrong But What Is Right Or Wrong That Counts."
--Geoff Metctalf


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Values for a New Millennium: Activating the Natural Law to Reduce Violence, Revitalize Our Schools, and Promote Cross-Cultural Harmony | [Robert Humphrey]



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World & National News

Peter Theil's Embrace of Trump Has Silicon Valley Squirming

Peter Thiel at the Republican National Convention on Tuesday. Mr. Thiel, the billionaire co-founder of PayPal, is scheduled to speak at the convention on Thursday night. Some in tech worry that his speech could damage the public’s perception of Silicon Valley. Credit Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press  
 
When the technology investor Peter Thiel takes the stage just before Donald J. Trump at the Republican convention this week, he will become the most prominent public face of a species so endangered it might as well be called extinct: the Silicon Valley Trump supporter.

Nobody knows what Mr. Thiel, a co-founder of PayPal, will say (he declined an interview), but in the tech industry, his appearance at the convention is being greeted with more apprehension than excitement. Venture capitalists have a special term for investment opportunities that offer the potential for a big return but also carry a great deal of risk: high beta. For Silicon Valley’s political aspirations, Mr. Thiel’s speech is the ultimate high-beta performance.



Christie: I Reminded Delegates of Hillary's 'Miserable Failures'
             Image result for chris christie
 
Republican delegates were fired up Tuesday night by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's decision to lay out the case against presumptive Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, and he said Wednesday that's because he reminded them of "every one of her miserable failures."

 "Last night I really needed to make the case slowly and methodically, factually against Hillary Clinton," Christie told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" program. "The problem is people in my party often get so angry about her that they yell and they scream and they use kind of divisive language that doesn't get to the core of my problem with her."

But when he asked the delegates Tuesday whether Clinton was "guilty or not guilty," the delegates yelled back "guilty," and as he spoke, they erupted with calls to "lock her up."

CONVENTION SHOWDOWN: 'DAILY SHOW' CREW FREAKOUT -- WHEN THEY'RE FILMED...
'NOT FUNNY'
MEDIA MADNESS: NIGHT 2...
Republican Convention Is Coup for CNN, MSNBC...



Eric Trump: I wrote 'every single word' of my speech myself  

             Image result for eric trump

Eric Trump, who will make the case for his father during a prime-time address Wednesday evening at the Republican National Convention, said he personally wrote his entire speech.

“I … took immense pride,” Mr. Trump, the son of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, said on ABC’s “Good Morning America.” “I wrote every single word of my speech myself.”

“I think sometimes when you write from the heart, and I’ll certainly deliver it from the heart, the product will be what it will be, but it’ll be certainly sincere and full of love and full of emotion and … that’s how it’s supposed to be,” he said.

Donald Trump Jr. and Tiffany Trump, two of the GOP presidential nominee’s other children, spoke at the convention Tuesday night, working to present a side of their father apart from the tough-talking reality TV persona many Americans associate with him.



Ted Cruz will leave 'no doubt' he wants Trup to be president

Donald Trump’s campaign chairman said Wednesday that Sen. Ted Cruz will leave “no doubt” he wants Mr. Trump to be president in his address to the Republican National Convention, though he hadn’t yet seen Mr. Cruz’s planned remarks.

“I have not seen [his] speech so I can’t tell you what he’s going to say,” Mr. Manafort said on CNN’s “New Day, adding he thinks Mr. Cruz will be speaking Wednesday about the same kinds of issues that he talked about during the primaries.

“I think you’ll see [after] the end of his speech tonight that Senator Cruz will be part of the campaign going forward — in what capacity, I’m not certain,” Mr. Manafort said. “But his words will leave no doubt that he wants Donald Trump to be president of the United States.”



Declassified 9/11 report chapter details Saudi funding of Muslim extremism in U.S.

      FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2001 file photo, a shell of what was once part of the facade of one of the twin towers of New York's World Trade Center rises above the rubble that remains after both towers were destroyed in New York. Whether they survived the attacks by fleeing the buildings, worked at the site after the attacks or simply lived near-by, people are still dealing with the emotion effects of the attacks 13 years later.   (AP Photo/Shawn Baldwin, File)

Saudi Arabia was funding Muslim radicalism in mosques and charities at the time the Sept. 11, 2001, hijackers were gathering in the United States and making contacts with Saudi nationals, according to a declassified intelligence document.

To jihad watchers, the paper confirms their charges that the Saudi government and its wealthy citizens fund extremist teachings in America. To this day, the kingdom is pressing its harsh Wahhabi Sunni Islam on American Muslims as it seeks to spread Islam around the world, they say.

In the document, one Saudi who was receiving money from Prince Bandar bin Sultan, Riyadh’s ambassador to the U.S. at the time, made a startling statement to an FBI informant. The man, who had ties to some of the hijackers, told agents that it would do the U.S. no good to limit entry visas because a sufficient number of Muslims were already in the country to destroy it and create an Islamic state.



UN pushes fast-track ratification of Paris climate deal as countries get cold feet

The United Nations has issued a plea for nations to fast-track ratification of the Paris Climate Agreement as some countries are backtracking on support for the deal’s sweeping restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon urged nations to attend a “special event” Thursday where they may deposit their “instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession to the Paris Agreement on climate change.”

His push for rapid ratification comes amid the increasingly chilly reception for the agreement, adopted by 195 parties to the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change in Paris, by nations concerned about the impact of the carbon restrictions.

The change of heart even has a name: “Clexit,” short for “climate exit,” a take-off on “Brexit,” the successful June 23 British vote to leave the European Union.



North Korea says missile tests simulated nucleare strike on South

North Korea said on Wednesday (July 20) its latest ballistic missile tests were personally ordered and monitored by supreme leader Kim Jong-Un and simulated nuclear strikes on US bases in South Korea.

The three missiles launched on Tuesday simulated pre-emptive attacks on South Korean ports and airfields hosting US military "hardware", the North's official KCNA news agency said.

The tests "examined the operational features of the detonating devices of nuclear warheads mounted on the ballistic rockets at the designated altitude over the target area", it said.


Roger Ailes Leaving Fox?

Fox News has denied a headline on The Drudge Report Tuesday afternoon that CEO Roger Ailes is leaving his post as an investigation into his alleged sexual harassment of Megyn Kelly, Gretchen Carlson and other employees is underway.

 An initial headline on the site beneath a flashing siren GIF reserved for big stories said Ailes had agreed to leave Fox News with a "40+ million parachute. That report was also independently confirmed by The Daily Beast.

 But Fox quickly denied it:



Jihadis in France,, Islamists in Turkey
While Western leaders dither, others are shaping the 21st century

Streets ran red with blood in both France and Turkey last week. A terrorist atrocity and an attempted coup are quite different events. But underlying both is this question: How are the most dynamic forces within the Islamic world shaping the 21st century?

Jihadism is, as should be obvious, one of those forces. Those fighting what they call a holy war — al Qaeda, the Islamic State and the Islamic Republic of Iran among them — regard “others” as enemies who must submit or be conquered or be killed. Their goal, and they’re candid about this, is to establish Islamic domination anywhere they can and, eventually, everywhere they can.

To call such behavior radical or extreme is ahistorical. They are doing what tribes, nations and empires have done since time immemorial. It is we in the West who have deviated from the norm by insisting that it has somehow suddenly become natural for peoples to peacefully coexist, to celebrate their differences, and to accept compromises rather than pursue victories.

To make matters worse, moral relativists have undermined what should have been unshakeable Western values. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, we had an opportunity to make a persuasive case that no cause or grievance justifies intentionally killing other people’s children. Instead, prominent voices (e.g., Stephen Jukes, then global news editor of Reuters, today a professor of journalism) insisted that “one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter.”



Europe's challenge after Brexit
Only reform of the bankrupt welfare system can assuage Euroskepticism

New surveys released this week by Britain’s EEF manufacturers’ organization and by PricewaterhouseCoopers predict that the United Kingdom’s June 23 vote to leave the European Union will result in economic slowdown. That may or may not prove true.

What is true is that the worst thing the rest of the world can do is treat the British vote as a typical example of English eccentricity or to see it solely as an economic matter.

The Brexit vote was a sign that the British people had lost faith in globalization and in the political institutions and arrangements that encourage it. This should be of great concern to Western leaders.




   Medal of Honor
 Army Medal of Honor

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force which can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States.
GeneTrerally presented to its recipient by the President of the United States of America in the name of Congress.
The first award of the Medal of Honor was made March 25, 1863 to Private JACOB PARROTT.The last award of the Medal of Honor was made September 15, 2011 to Sergeant DAKOTA MEYER.

Since then there have been:  • 3458 recipients of the Medal of Honor.
    • Today there are 85 Living Recipients of the Medal of Honor.

VERSACE, HUMBERT R.
'Rocky'
Rank: Captain
Organization: U.S. Army
Date of Issue: 07/08/2002
VERSACE, HUMBERT R. Photo
Citation

Captain Humbert R. Versace distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period of 29 October 1963 to 26 September 1965, while serving as S-2 Advisor, Military Assistance Advisory Group, Detachment 52, Ca Mau, Republic of Vietnam. While accompanying a Civilian Irregular Defense Group patrol engaged in combat operations in Thoi Binh District, An Xuyen Province, Captain Versace and the patrol came under sudden and intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire from elements of a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged, Captain Versace, although severely wounded in the knee and back by hostile fire, fought valiantly and continued to engage enemy targets. Weakened by his wounds and fatigued by the fierce firefight, Captain Versace stubbornly resisted capture by the over-powering Viet Cong force with the last full measure of his strength and ammunition. Taken prisoner by the Viet Cong, he exemplified the tenets of the Code of Conduct from the time he entered into Prisoner of War status. Captain Versace assumed command of his fellow American soldiers, scorned the enemy's exhaustive interrogation and indoctrination efforts, and made three unsuccessful attempts to escape, despite his weakened condition which was brought about by his wounds and the extreme privation and hardships he was forced to endure. During his captivity, Captain Versace was segregated in an isolated prisoner of war cage, manacled in irons for prolonged periods of time, and placed on extremely reduced ration. The enemy was unable to break his indomitable will, his faith in God, and his trust in the United States of America. Captain Versace, an American fighting man who epitomized the principles of his country and the Code of Conduct, was executed by the Viet Cong on 26 September 1965. Captain Versace's gallant actions in close contact with an enemy force and unyielding courage and bravery while a prisoner of war are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the United States Army.



From the Archives

American Fairness to a Fault — a Deadly One
Tuesday, 10 Nov 2009 02:28 PM

American’s tragic flaw is our unbridled fairness, which has been corrupted ever more by the cancer of political correctness to the point we put ourselves at risk rather than create even the perception of prejudice.

Sometime after the VOLAR (all volunteer) Army, the military veered from the “yes sir, yes sir, three bags full” blind adherence to all orders to the concept of refusing “unlawful orders” and that was ostensibly a good thing.

However, the uniformed services do not set or get to pick and choose foreign policy. The civilian leadership sets foreign policy, and the U.S. military enforces it — with a big, honking combined arms stick.

Retired Lt. Col. Ralph Peters has been one of the rare pundits with the courage to target the “culture of political correctness” in leadership of the military. In at least two interviews on Fox, Peters (correctly) blamed the culture of political correctness for the Army’s diffidence in taking action against Nidal Malik Hasan in the wake of knowledge of the problem.

Many mechanisms exist for dealing with matters of deep conscience — all without killing those one might think disagree with in principle.

However, it is not prejudice to discriminate based on threat facts in evidence. Refusal to act judiciously for fear of a tainted perception is just plain dumb.

Notwithstanding the articulated fears of the Army chief of staff and the secretary of Homeland Security, officials made an epic mistake in handling suspicions about Hasan. A mistake founded on political correctness and sustained by diffidence that cost the lives of innocents.

Reportedly, U.S. intelligence agencies were aware (months ago) that Hasan was attempting to make contact with people associated with al-Qaida. He spoke openly to too many people about his angst and misdirected sympathies. He was apparently a poster child for suspicion, and the Army failed bigtime to intervene.

“It is not known whether the intelligence agencies informed the Army that one of its officers was seeking to connect with suspected al-Qaida figures," the officials said.

But you damnbetcha they SHOULD have done so.

Investigators want to know whether Hasan maintained contact with a radical mosque leader from Virginia, Anwar al Awlaki, who now lives in Yemen and runs a Web site that promotes jihad around the world against the United States.

In a recent blog posting titled "Nidal Hassan Did the Right Thing," Awlaki calls Hasan a "hero" and a "man of conscience who could not bear living the contradiction of being a Muslim and serving in an army that is fighting against his own people."

Increasingly we are told people who knew or worked with Hasan say he seemed to become gradually more radical in his condemnation of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Subordinates and superiors had a responsibility to flag the inappropriate rhetoric, and they apparently did not.

The fear to speak out is a symptom of the PC disease fueled by recriminations and implied threats of discrimination — a fear that indirectly resulted in mayhem.

Sen. Joseph Lieberman said, "If Hasan was showing signs, saying to people that he had become an Islamist extremist, the U.S. Army has to have a zero tolerance," and despite the echo of shutting the barn door after the horse got out, he is right.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey Jr. is concerned that speculation about the religious beliefs of Hasan could “cause a backlash against some of our Muslim soldiers.” He’s right, but such a backlash would be a direct result of the failure of command — not prejudice.

When confronted about whether he thought the Army “dropped the ball” in not responding to warning signs, Casey replied that the Army needs to be careful not to jump to conclusions based on early tidbits of information.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R.-S.C., and Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., both of whom are veterans, took pains to say that Muslims have served honorably in the military and at risk to their lives.

“At the end of the day, this is not about his religion — the fact that this man was a Muslim,” Graham said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

But, hey, it is (kinda/sorta) about religion (when the FBI says 10 percent of American Mosques preach jihad) — at least from a risk analysis perspective.