Friday October 2nd, 2015

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World & National
US hiring slowed   in September as global economy weakened

U.S. employers cut back sharply on hiring in September and added fewer jobs in July and August than previously thought - a sour note for a labor market that had been steadily improving.

The economy added just 142,000 jobs last month, depressed by job cuts by manufacturers and oil drillers. The unemployment rate remained 5.1 percent, but only because many Americans have stopped looking for work and are no longer counted as unemployed. The proportion of adults either with a job or looking for one is at a 38-year low.
Record 94,610,000 Americans Not in Labor Force...
Participation Rate Lowest Since 1977...
Record 56,647,000 Women Not Working...
'Payrolls Disaster'...
'Fed never going to raise rates'...
Markets at 'panic levels'...

Oregon Gunman Targeted Christians, 'Horrific Act of Cowardice'

Residents of a quiet Oregon town struggled to comprehend the carnage left by the latest U.S. mass shooting as investigators puzzled over what drove a young gunman to kill nine people -- apparently  targeting some because they were Christian -- in a college classroom before he died in an exchange of gunfire with police.

The Thursday late-morning shooting rampage at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, a former timber town of 20,000 on the western edge of the Cascade Mountains, ranked as the deadliest mass killing this year in the United States.

Oregon Shooting: 'Heroic' Veteran Chris Mintz Was Shot 7 Times

An Army veteran was shot seven times while trying to save other students during the deadly Oregon community college rampage, according to his aunt.

Chris Mintz "tried to protect some people," his aunt Sheila Brown told NBC News in a telephone interview. "We were told he did heroic things to protect some people."

She said that Mintz was shot seven times and had been in surgery since the shooting that left 10 dead, including the gunman.

Obama goes after guns, says GOP Congress responsible for 'routine' mass shootings?
            An outraged President Obama weighed in Thursday night on the side of more restrictive gun laws, a position many Democratic lawmakers support. (Associated Press)

A visibly shaken and angry President Obama on Thursday attacked the American gun lobby, scolded the media and demanded that Congress take concrete action to stop the rash of recent mass shootings, which he said have “become routine” and are the pure result of inaction by lawmakers in Washington.

Speaking in the briefing room at the White House, the president — who offered his 15th statement in the wake of a mass shooting — said the federal government must explain to grieving families why it has virtually nothing to stop tragedies like the one seen on the campus of Oregon’s Umpqua Community College Thursday.

Gun Groups Enraged at Obama's Rant After Oregon Shooting

Gun rights groups Thursday slammed President Barack Obama for using the Oregon community college shooting to push for more gun control, with Dave Dalton of the American Gun Owners Association telling Newsmax that "I literally screamed at the TV set" as the president spoke.

Dalton said he was particularly incensed at Obama's remark that " 'it's just too easy to get a gun' without having any knowledge of the facts.

"They don't have any facts about the situation," he added. "How the person got the gun? What the person's mental capabilities were? Were they unstable? It's always, 'It's too easy to get a gun.'"

Iranian troops move into Syria as White House blames Russia for worsening crisis
           In this image made from video provided by Hadi Al-Abdallah, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, smoke rises after airstrikes in Kafr Nabel of the Idlib province, western Syria, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. Russian jets carried out a second day of airstrikes in Syria Thursday, but there were conflicting claims about whether they were targeting Islamic State and al-Qaeda militants or trying to shore up the defenses of President Bashar Assad. (Hadi Al-Abdallah via AP)

Hundreds of Iranian troops have moved into Syria to join a major ground offensive in support of President Bashar Assad’s government, as the White House expressed fears Thursday that Russia’s military intervention will worsen sectarian violence there and prolong the civil war.

Two Lebanese sources told Reuters that hundreds of Iranian troops with equipment and weapons had reached Syria in the past 10 days to mount a major ground campaign. They would also be backed by Mr. Assad’s Lebanese Hezbollah allies and by Shiite militia fighters from Iraq, while Russia would provide air support.

Hillary raises Huma's profile within campaign as controversies swirl

Hillary Rodham Clinton has undertaken another mission with her presidential campaign: to rehabilitate the battered image of longtime aide and confidante Huma Abedin.

The steps Mrs. Clinton has taken to raise the profile of Ms. Abedin in the campaign include using her prominently in a fundraising email and deploying her to Twitter for the first time.

House votes to block sanctions relief until Iran pays US victims of terrorism

Taking the first steps to try to scuttle the Iran nuclear agreement, the House approved a bill Thursday that would block President Obama from lifting sanctions on Tehran until the regime makes billions of dollars in court-ordered payments to American victims of state-sponsored terrorism.

Mr. Obama has vowed to veto the bill, saying it would ruin his efforts to carry out the pact brokered by the U.S., Iran and five leading nations to delay the Islamic republic’s push to acquire an atomic bomb in exchange for relief from international sanctions.

Sharyll Attkisson read to rock political talk show kingdom

This could jolt the chatty Sunday talk show realm: The investigators have arrived. “Full Measure with Sharyl Attkisson” debuts this weekend, focusing on investigative journalism and authentic accountability rather than sound bites and talking points, its creators say.

“We will pierce secrecy and seek accountability from government, corporations and special interests. We will report on untouchable topics in a fearless way with a team of award-winning journalists. We will follow the trail no matter where it leads,” says Ms. Attkisson, a former CBS correspondent and author of the recent bestseller “Stonewalled.” She pines for a proactive public, urging viewers to seek advice from trustworthy sources and make up their own minds about the complexities of politics, money, power and hidden alliances.

25 Greatest John Wayne Quotes

John Wayne is a legend the world over because he embodied what many consider to be the quintessential American spirit.

Decades after his death in 1979, his legacy continues to live on in the more than 170 motion pictures in which he starred, as well as the John Wayne Cancer Foundation, which recently staged its 4th Annual John Wayne Film Festival in Dallas.

Gathered below are 25 of The Duke's most memorable quotes.
        J.B. Books in "The Shootist" (1976) — "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people, and I require the same from them."

When world leaders got garbage for lunch

They gave the world leaders, in town for the opening session of the United Nations, lunch in New York the other day and all they got was swill. The leaders munching on the people’s dime said a good time was had by all, but that’s only if your taste runs to garbage. The chefs cheerfully conceded that that garbage was what it was.

It was all about celebrating global warming, to try to make a point that food and sustainable agriculture are an important point of something called “energy transition.” Only world-class diplomats could make up argle-bargle like this, that there’s a connection between food and farming. Food actually comes from cans and burlap bags, doesn’t it?

The infamous Roman Emperor Caligula and the US Congress

What do they have in common?

The infamous Roman Emperor Caligula used to post his new laws high upon a column so the Roman citizens could not study them. These tactics were dictatorial and antiquated. Nothing like this would happen in the United States Republic, right? Wrong. When it comes to today’s laws, there is very little difference between the deceptive tactics of Caligula and the U.S. Congress.

American citizens cannot study the laws passed by Congress, not because they are unattainably high upon a column but because they are unattainable due to their largesse and legalese. American citizens have become despondent and apathetic because the bills and laws are so voluminous they cannot be read and so incomprehensible they cannot be understood. James Madison predicted that it would be of no avail for men to elect men of their own choice if they could not understand what was in the laws. How does one know what is in the bill or law, and equally as important, how can one hold a representative accountable, under such circumstances. Caligula knew this well.

                 Medal of Honor
Army Medal of HonorNavy Medal of HonorAir Force Medal of Honor

The Medal of Honor is the highest award for valor in action against an enemy force which can be bestowed upon an individual serving in the Armed Services of the United States.
GeneTrerally presented to its recipient by the President of the United States of America in the name of Congress.
The first award of the Medal of Honor was made March 25, 1863 to Private JACOB PARROTT.The last award of the Medal of Honor was made September 15, 2011 to Sergeant DAKOTA MEYER.

Since then there have been:  • 3458 recipients of the Medal of Honor.
    • Today there are 85 Living Recipients of the Medal of Honor.

Rank: Captain
Organization: U.S. Army
Date of Issue: 07/08/2002

Captain Humbert R. Versace distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism during the period of 29 October 1963 to 26 September 1965, while serving as S-2 Advisor, Military Assistance Advisory Group, Detachment 52, Ca Mau, Republic of Vietnam. While accompanying a Civilian Irregular Defense Group patrol engaged in combat operations in Thoi Binh District, An Xuyen Province, Captain Versace and the patrol came under sudden and intense mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire from elements of a heavily armed enemy battalion. As the battle raged, Captain Versace, although severely wounded in the knee and back by hostile fire, fought valiantly and continued to engage enemy targets. Weakened by his wounds and fatigued by the fierce firefight, Captain Versace stubbornly resisted capture by the over-powering Viet Cong force with the last full measure of his strength and ammunition. Taken prisoner by the Viet Cong, he exemplified the tenets of the Code of Conduct from the time he entered into Prisoner of War status. Captain Versace assumed command of his fellow American soldiers, scorned the enemy's exhaustive interrogation and indoctrination efforts, and made three unsuccessful attempts to escape, despite his weakened condition which was brought about by his wounds and the extreme privation and hardships he was forced to endure. During his captivity, Captain Versace was segregated in an isolated prisoner of war cage, manacled in irons for prolonged periods of time, and placed on extremely reduced ration. The enemy was unable to break his indomitable will, his faith in God, and his trust in the United States of America. Captain Versace, an American fighting man who epitomized the principles of his country and the Code of Conduct, was executed by the Viet Cong on 26 September 1965. Captain Versace's gallant actions in close contact with an enemy force and unyielding courage and bravery while a prisoner of war are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the United States Army.

From the Archives

American Fairness to a Fault — a Deadly One
Tuesday, 10 Nov 2009 02:28 PM

American’s tragic flaw is our unbridled fairness, which has been corrupted ever more by the cancer of political correctness to the point we put ourselves at risk rather than create even the perception of prejudice.

Sometime after the VOLAR (all volunteer) Army, the military veered from the “yes sir, yes sir, three bags full” blind adherence to all orders to the concept of refusing “unlawful orders” and that was ostensibly a good thing.

However, the uniformed services do not set or get to pick and choose foreign policy. The civilian leadership sets foreign policy, and the U.S. military enforces it — with a big, honking combined arms stick.

Retired Lt. Col. Ralph Peters has been one of the rare pundits with the courage to target the “culture of political correctness” in leadership of the military. In at least two interviews on Fox, Peters (correctly) blamed the culture of political correctness for the Army’s diffidence in taking action against Nidal Malik Hasan in the wake of knowledge of the problem.

Many mechanisms exist for dealing with matters of deep conscience — all without killing those one might think disagree with in principle.

However, it is not prejudice to discriminate based on threat facts in evidence. Refusal to act judiciously for fear of a tainted perception is just plain dumb.

Notwithstanding the articulated fears of the Army chief of staff and the secretary of Homeland Security, officials made an epic mistake in handling suspicions about Hasan. A mistake founded on political correctness and sustained by diffidence that cost the lives of innocents.

Reportedly, U.S. intelligence agencies were aware (months ago) that Hasan was attempting to make contact with people associated with al-Qaida. He spoke openly to too many people about his angst and misdirected sympathies. He was apparently a poster child for suspicion, and the Army failed bigtime to intervene.

“It is not known whether the intelligence agencies informed the Army that one of its officers was seeking to connect with suspected al-Qaida figures," the officials said.

But you damnbetcha they SHOULD have done so.

Investigators want to know whether Hasan maintained contact with a radical mosque leader from Virginia, Anwar al Awlaki, who now lives in Yemen and runs a Web site that promotes jihad around the world against the United States.

In a recent blog posting titled "Nidal Hassan Did the Right Thing," Awlaki calls Hasan a "hero" and a "man of conscience who could not bear living the contradiction of being a Muslim and serving in an army that is fighting against his own people."

Increasingly we are told people who knew or worked with Hasan say he seemed to become gradually more radical in his condemnation of the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Subordinates and superiors had a responsibility to flag the inappropriate rhetoric, and they apparently did not.

The fear to speak out is a symptom of the PC disease fueled by recriminations and implied threats of discrimination — a fear that indirectly resulted in mayhem.

Sen. Joseph Lieberman said, "If Hasan was showing signs, saying to people that he had become an Islamist extremist, the U.S. Army has to have a zero tolerance," and despite the echo of shutting the barn door after the horse got out, he is right.

Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey Jr. is concerned that speculation about the religious beliefs of Hasan could “cause a backlash against some of our Muslim soldiers.” He’s right, but such a backlash would be a direct result of the failure of command — not prejudice.

When confronted about whether he thought the Army “dropped the ball” in not responding to warning signs, Casey replied that the Army needs to be careful not to jump to conclusions based on early tidbits of information.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R.-S.C., and Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., both of whom are veterans, took pains to say that Muslims have served honorably in the military and at risk to their lives.

“At the end of the day, this is not about his religion — the fact that this man was a Muslim,” Graham said on CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

But, hey, it is (kinda/sorta) about religion (when the FBI says 10 percent of American Mosques preach jihad) — at least from a risk analysis perspective.